Influential Filmmakers of the 1970s: Robert Altman


Robert Altman was a pioneer in the 1970s filmmaking. He was highly prolific during this decade often directing one to two films a year. His unique style included making films with multiple interwoven storylines in an episodic television-like format. His large ensemble casts often improvised their performances, which included overlapping dialogue. This process created a naturalistic and quirky feel to his films. He also took traditional genres, skewing and reworking their narrative structures, and producing ambiguous endings to many of his films. In addition, a number of his movies included his own strong social commentaries on the events of the day.

Source: Indiewire ‘Robert Altman’s Top 15 Films’ October 13, 2014

Altman was very much an actor’s director, directing Sally Kellerman, Julie Christie, Ronee Blakley, Lily Tomlin, Helen Mirren and Maggie Smith in Oscar nominated performances. Altman himself was nominated five times for the Best Director Oscar and was awarded a honourary Oscar in 2006. He won a Primetime Emmy award in 1989 for Outstanding Directing in a Drama Series for the mini-series Tanner ‘88 (1988).

Altman began his filmmaking career directing documentaries, as well as employee training, industrial and educational films. He later moved into television in the 1950s and 1960s, directing TV movies and episodes of shows such as Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1955-62), The Millionaire (1955-60), Whirlybirds (1957-60), Maverick (1957-62), Lawman (1958-62), Surfside 6 (1960-62), Peter Gunn (1958-61), Bonanza (1959-73), Route 66 (1960-64), Bus Stop (1960-61) and Kraft Mystery Theater (1960-63).

He made his feature film debut with Countdown (1967) with James Caan and Robert Duvall. He was fired during the editing process, as he refused to comply with studio demands. His next film That Cold Day in the Park (1969) was a critical and commercial failure.

Altman hit his stride as a notable film director with the breakthrough, dark comic-satire M*A*S*H (1970). The movie tells the story of the outrageous antics of a field hospital’s eccentric staff during the Korean War. Altman received his first Best Director Oscar nomination for the film. He was also nominated for a Best Director Golden Globe and a Directors Guild of America (DGA) Award. In addition, Altman won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival. The movie itself was nominated for five Oscars, including Best Picture, Supporting Actress (Sally Kellerman) and Film Editing. It won one Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay. It was also nominated for six Golden Globes (1970), including Best Actors in a Comedy or Musical (Elliot Gould & Donald Sutherland), Supporting Actress (Kellerman) and Screenplay. The movie won the Best Motion Picture Comedy or Musical Golden Globe that year. It also won a Writers Guild of America (WGA) Award for Best Comedy Adapted from Another Medium.

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That same year, he directed the off-beat, surrealistic comedy Brewster McCloud (1970) about a reclusive young man (Bud Cort) living in the Huston Astrodome who is fashioning a pair of wings to help him fly.

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Altman’s next major work was the acclaimed revisionist western McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971). Set in the late 1800s, a gambler (Warren Beatty) and a prostitute (Julie Christie) run a high-class brothel and experience problems when competitors try to purchase the business. Christie received her second Best Actress Oscar nomination for the movie. The movie was also nominated for a WGA Award for Best Drama Adapted from Another Medium. The film initially received poor reviews upon its release and did not do well at the box office. It achieved critical acclaim and recognition in later years.

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The next year, Altman directed Images (1972) a psychological thriller about a vacationing, mentally unbalanced children’s books author (Susannah York) who becomes increasingly caught up in her delusions and fantasies with dire consequences. Altman was nominated for a Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival and York took home the Best Actress Prize. Altman was also nominated for a WGA award for Best Drama Written Directly for the Screen. The film itself was nominated for a Best English-Language Foreign Film Golden Globe and was nominated for one Academy Award for Best Original Dramatic Score (John Williams).

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Altman followed that film with the acclaimed, re-fashioned film noir The Long Goodbye (1973) about a private detective (Elliott Gould) who gets involved in a complicated murder investigation after helping a friend flee the country for Mexico.

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The next year, Altman directed two movies Thieves Like Us (1974) and California Split (1974). A re-imagined, depression-era caper movie, Thieves Like Us tells story of two men (Keith Carradine and John Schuck) who, after escaping from prison, go back to robbing banks with the help of a new accomplice (Bert Remsen). The National Board of Review selected the movie as one of the Top Ten Films of 1974.

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California Split (1974) was a buddy comedy about two gamblers (Elliott Gould and George Segal) who get involved in increasingly dark misadventures as they win and lose large amounts of money together.

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Altman’s next movie Nashville (1975) is considered by many as his masterpiece.It is a dark satirical comedy, which skews the American way of life and its obsessions with fame and commercialism. Shot under 45 days, the film follows multiple storylines featuring various people involved in the country music industry and a political fundraiser. Altman received his second Best Director Oscar nomination for the movie. He was also nominated for a Best Director Golden Globe. The film itself was nominated for five Oscars, including Best Picture and Supporting Actresses (Ronee Blakley & Lily Tomlin) and winning for Best Original Song (I’m Easy). The movie was also nominated for eleven Golden Globes and won for Best Original Song. The film’s other Golden Globe nominations were for Best Motion Picture Drama, Supporting Actor (Henry Gibson), Supporting Actresses (Blakley, Tomlin, Geraldine Chaplin and Barbara Harris), Screenplay and Acting Debuts (Blakley and Tomlin). In addition, the movie was nominated for a WGA Award for Best Drama Written Directly for the Screen and for five Best Actress British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Film Awards.

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Altman followed the success of Nashville with the satirical, comedic, revisionist western Buffalo Bill and the Indians, or Sitting Bull’s History Lesson (1976) which was poorly received by both critics and audiences. The movie’s story focuses on a fictional account of Buffalo Bill (Paul Newman)’s attempt to enlist Sitting Bull (Frank Kaquitts) to participate in Bill’s Wild West Show, which features negative portrayals of Indigenous Americans. Despite the film’s largely negative reception, the movie won the Golden Bear at the 26th Berlin International Film Festival.

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Altman next directed the surrealistic psychological study 3 Women (1977) about two very different physical therapists (Shelley Duvall and Sissy Spacek) who become obsessive friends and roommates in an apartment building owned by an enigmatic pregnant woman (Janice Rule) and her drunken husband. The movie was praised by critics, but did not do well at the box office. Altman was nominated for a Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival and Duvall took home the Best Actress Prize. Duvall was also nominated for a Best Actress British BAFTA Film Award and was awarded Best Actress by the Los Angeles Film Critics Association. Sissy Spacek took home the New York Film Critics Circle Awards Best Supporting Actress award for the movie.

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Altman returned to the style of filmmaking he was most famous for in the satirical black comedy A Wedding (1978) with multiple storylines and a large ensemble cast. The story takes place over a single day during the wedding between a young bride (Amy Stryker) from a nouveau riche Kentucky family and the young groom (Desi Arnaz Jr.) from a wealthy Chicago family with suspected ties to the mafia. Altman was nominated for two BAFTA Film Awards for Best Director and Screenplay (sharing the latter nomination with John Considine, Patricia Resnick and Allan F. Nicholls). They also received a WGA nomination for Best Comedy Written Directly for the Screen. In addition, Altman was nominated for France’s César Award for Best Foreign Film. Carol Burnett received a Best Supporting Actress Golden Globes nomination for playing the bride’s mother. The movie marked Lillian Gish’s 100th film.

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Altman ended the decade with two very different movies: the dystopian science fiction film Quintet (1979) and the romantic comedy A Perfect Couple (1979). The negatively reviewed, box office flop Quintet presented a futuristic, post-apocalyptic vision of the earth during a new ice age where a group of surviving humans is playing a deadly version of a game called ‘Quintet.’

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A Perfect Couple was also negatively received by both audiences and critics. The centers on an older, repressed man (Paul Dooley) who is romancing a younger, bohemian musician (Marta Heflin).

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Altman worked directing both theatre and motion picture productions in the 1980s. His film work during this decade began with two big budget disasters: the satirical comedy HealtH (1980) and the musical Popeye (1980) with Robin Williams. Later films during this decade included filmed treatments of theatrical productions such as Come Back to the 5 & Dime Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean (1982) with Cher, Sandy Dennis and Karen Black, Streamers (1983) with Matthew Modine, Michael Wright and David Alan Grier, and Fool for Love (1985) with Sam Shepard, Kim Basinger, and Harry Dean Stanton. Altman was nominated for his fourth Palme d’Or for Fool for Love.

In the 1990s to the early 2000s, Altman’s filmmaking career had a revival due in particular to three critically acclaimed films: The Player (1992), Short Cuts (1993) and Gosford Park (2001). Altman received Best Director Oscar nominations for all three movies. For The Player, Altman also won a BAFTA for Best Director and was awarded the Best Director prize at the Cannes Film Festival. He was also nominated for a DGA Award and a Golden Globe for Best Director. For Short Cuts, he received a Best Screenplay Golden Globes nomination and won the Film Independent Spirit Award for Best Director. Finally for Gosford Park, he won the Best Director Golden Globe and was nominated for a David Lean Award for Direction at the BAFTAs. Julian Fellowes won the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay for Gosford Park.

Altman’s last film was A Prairie Home Companion (2006) with Lily Tomlin, Meryl Streep and Woody Harrelson.

In his personal life, Altman was married three times and had five children. Robert Altman died on November 20, 2006, at the age of 81 from leukemia.

Altman’s influence on filmmaking continues to be recognized today with his films M*A*S*H (1970), McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971), The Long Goodbye (1973) and Nashville (1975) being selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.” The Film Independent’s Robert Altman Award has been awarded to the ensemble cast, director and casting director of independent films since 2009.

~Terry Gale

Influential Filmmakers of the 1970s: Alan J. Pakula


Alan J. Pakula was a prolific film director in the 1970s known for his dark conspiracy thrillers, including his “paranoia trilogy.” In particular, Pakula was interested in exploring man’s psyches when faced with fear. He also had a reputation for being an actor’s director who directed Jane Fonda, Jason Robards and Meryl Streep in Oscar winning performances. He also directed Liza Minnelli, Jane Alexander, Richard Farnsworth, Jill Clayburgh and Candice Bergen in Oscar nominated roles.

Alan J. Pakula on set

Pakula began his career working as an assistant to the head of the cartoon department at Warner Brothers. He later became an assistant producer at MGM before moving to Paramount Pictures. By the 1960s, Alan J. Pakula was a well-established film producer who was nominated for an Oscar for producing Best Picture nominee To Kill a Mockingbird (1962).

He made his directorial debut with The Sterile Cuckoo (1969), which was nominated for two Oscars for Best Actress (Liza Minnelli) and Best Original Song (Come Saturday Morning). Minnelli was also nominated for a Best Actress – Drama Golden Globe. The movie tells the story of a love affair between two inexperienced college freshmen, a neurotic young woman (Minnelli) and a reserved young man (Wendell Burton).

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Pakula then directed the first of his three 1970s conspiracy thrillers Klute (1971). The movie was nominated for two Oscars with Jane Fonda winning her first Best Actress Oscar. The film was also nominated for a Best Adapted Screenplay Oscar. Fonda also won the Best Actress – Drama Golden Globe. In addition, the film was nominated for a Best Screenplay Golden Globe. Klute was also nominated for a Writers Guild of America Award for Best Drama Written Directly for the Screen. The film’s story focuses on a private detective (Donald Sutherland) who is investigating a missing person case and becomes involved with a high-priced prostitute (Fonda) being stalked by a killer.

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Pakula next directed a romantic dramady Love and Pain and the Whole Damn Thing (1973). The movie follows the story of a young American (Timothy Bottoms) on a bicycle tour of Europe who meets and falls in love with an older English woman (Maggie Smith).

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He followed this movie with directing the second of his conspiracy thrillers The Parallax View (1974). The film was nominated for a Writers Guild of America Award for Best Drama Adapted from Another Medium. The film is about a news reporter (Warren Beatty) who is investigating a conspiracy connected to the assassination of a senator and the shady dealings of a multinational corporation.

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Pakula received his only Best Director Oscar nomination for his next project, which was the third of his 1970s conspiracy thrillers All the President’s Men (1976). He also received a Directors Guild of America and a Best Director Golden Globe nomination for the movie. The film was a commercial and critical success. It was nominated for a total of eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Supporting Actress (Jane Alexander) and Film Editing. It won four Oscars for Best Supporting Actor (Jason Robards), Adapted Screenplay, Art Direction and Sound. The movie also received a Writers Guild of America nomination for Best Drama Adapted from Another Medium. In addition, it received four Golden Globe nominations, including Best Picture, Supporting Actor (Robards) and Screenplay.  Based on a best-selling novel, the movie tells the true story of investigative journalists Carl Bernstein (Dustin Hoffman) and Bob Woodward (Robert Redford) as they uncover the illegal activities surrounding the Watergate scandal, ending the presidency of Richard Nixon.

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Pakula moved away from the thriller genre with his next film Comes a Horseman (1978). The movie is a western about a 1940’s struggling rancher woman (Jane Fonda) who refuses to sell her family’s land to a ruthless land owner (Jason Robards) buying up her neighbours’ properties in the quest for oil. The movie resulted in Richard Farnsworth receiving his first Oscar nomination (in this instance for Best Supporting Actor Oscar). Farnsworth was a former movie stunt man who transitioned in later life to a successful career as an acclaimed film actor.

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Pakula’s last movie in the 1970s was the romantic comedy Starting Over (1979). The film was nominated for two Oscars with Jill Clayburgh receiving her second Best Actress Oscar nomination and Candice Bergen received her first Best Supporting Actress nomination. The movie was also nominated for four Golden Globes, including Best Actor – Comedy (Burt Reynolds), Best Actress – Comedy (Clayburgh), Best Supporting Actress (Bergan) and Best Original Song (Better Than Ever). In addition, the movie received a Writers Guild of America nomination for Best Comedy Adapted from Another Medium. The movie follows a newly separated man (Reynolds) as he tries to create a new life for himself while juggling relationships with an independent school teacher (Clayburgh) and his cheating songwriter wife (Bergan).

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Pakula continued to direct motion pictures in the 1980s. His most notable achievement during this time period was Sophie’s Choice (1982), for which Pakula received his last Oscar nomination (in this instance for Best Adapted screenplay). The movie was nominated for a total of five Oscars with Meryl Streep receiving her first Best Actress Oscar for the movie.  

In the 1990s, Pakula directed a number of notable films. These movies included the thrillers Presumed Innocent (1990) with Harrison Ford and Raul Julia, and The Pelican Brief (1993) with Julia Roberts and Denzel Washington. Pakula’s last movie was The Devil’s Own (1997) with Harrison Ford and Brad Pitt.

In his personal life, Pakula was married twice. His first marriage was to actress Hope Lange who was nominated for a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for Peyton Place (1958). She was best known for her two-time Emmy winning Best Actress in a Comedy role in The Ghost & Mrs. Muir (1968-1970), which was highly popular in syndication.

Alan J. Pakula died on November 19, 1998 at age 70 following a freak motor vehicle accident. Another car struck a metal pipe on the roadway sending the pipe through Pakula’s windshield and hitting him in the head. He then smashed his car into a fence. Upon arrival at the hospital, Pakula was pronounced dead.

Pakula’s influence on the filmmaking continues to be recognized today with his films All the President’s Men and To Kill a Mockingbird both being selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.”

~Terry Gale

Influential Filmmakers of the 1970s: Hal Ashby


Hal Ashby had a strong presence as a film director in the 1970s. In particular, Ashby was noted for his quirky, off-beat, anti-establishment, counterculture films, which elicited strong performances from his actors. He directed Lee Grant, Jon Voight, Jane Fonda and Melvyn Douglas in Oscar winning performances. He also directed Jack Nicholson, Randy Quaid, Jack Warden and Peter Sellers in Oscar nominated roles.

Hal Ashby directing Bound for Glory (1976)

Ashby is recognized as being part of the New Hollywood wave of filmmaking. This era in American cinema is also known as American New Wave or the Hollywood Renaissance. It is recognized as a time when a new generation of young, edgy, independent filmmakers dominated the film industry from the mid-1960s to early 1980s.

In the 1960s, Hal Ashby was a well-established film editor who won the Best Film Editing Oscar for In the Heat of the Night (1967). He made his directorial debut with The Landlord (1970), which earned Lee Grant both Oscar and Golden Globe nominations for Best Supporting Actress. The movie is a social satire about a wealthy young man (Beau Bridges) who purchases a run-down Brooklyn tenement.

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Ashby’s next film was the cult classic Harold and Maude (1971), which was nominated for two Golden Globes and one BAFTA film award. The movie is a black comedy about a wealthy young man (Bud Cort) obsessed with death who falls in love with an eccentric, outgoing older woman (Ruth Gordon) who changes his life.

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He followed this up with The Last Detail (1973) for which he was nominated for Palme d’Or. The film was nominated for three Oscars, two Golden Globes and four BAFTA film awards (winning two for Best Actor and Screenplay). The film is a social comedy about the adventures of two navy sailors (Jack Nicholson and Otis Young) who decide to show a younger recruit (Randy Quaid) a good time before escorting him to a military prison.

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His next movie Shampoo (1975) is a social satire about a promiscuous hairstylist (Warren Beatty) as he juggles multiple relationships with his female clients on the eve of the 1968 American elections. The film was nominated for four Oscars, five Golden Globes and one BAFTA film award. Lee Grant won the Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her role in the film.

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Ashby’s next project was Bound for Glory (1976), the biographical tale of travelling folk singer Woody Guthrie (David Carradine) for which Ashby was nominated for his second Palme d’Or. The movie received six Oscar nominations, including Best Picture, and four Golden Globe nominations. It won two Oscars for Best Cinematography (Haskell Wexler) and Best Music, Original Song Score and Its Adaptation or Best Adaptation Score (Leonard Rosenman).

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Hal Ashby received is first (and only) Oscar nomination for Best Director for his next film Coming Home (1978). Ashby also received his third Ashby Palme d’Or nomination for the film. The movie is an anti-Vietnam War drama that tells the story of a love affair between the wife (Jane Fonda) of a serving marine (Bruce Dern) and a disabled veteran (Jon Voight). The movie was nominated for eight Oscars, including Best Picture, and won for Best Actor (Voight), Actress (Fonda) and Original Screenplay (Nancy Dowd, Waldo Salt and Robert C. Jones). It was also nominated for six Golden Globes, winning Best Actor (Voight) and Best Actress (Fonda) in a Drama.

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Following the critical and commercial success of Coming Home, Ashby was able to negotiate a deal with Lorimar and established his own film production company Northstar.

Ashby received his fourth Palme d’Or nomination for his last film in the 1970s Being There (1979), a satirical comedy about a simplistic and naïve gardener (Peter Sellers) who becomes the unlikely advisor to a wealthy Washington businessman and political insider (Melvyn Douglas). The movie was nominated for two Oscars, winning Best Supporting Actor (Douglas). It was also nominated for six BAFTA film awards, winning Best Screenplay (Jerzy Kosinski), and six Golden Globes, winning Best Actor in a Comedy or Musical (Sellers) and Best Supporting Actor (Douglas).

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Despite an auspicious career as a movie director in the 1970s, Hal Ashby’s career began to swiftly decline in the 1980s. Following Being There, Ashby was reputed to become more and more reclusive. Rumors also began to circulate about a drug addiction. In addition, Ashby began to have frequent clashes with studio executives during the production of his next films Second-Hand Hearts (1981) and Lookin’ to Get Out (1982), which culminated in his removal from directing Tootsie (1982). Ashby was also fired after producing a 20-minute rough cut of Neil Simon’s The Slugger’s Wife (1985), which went on to become both a commercial and critical flop. In addition, Ashby was let go on the final day of principal photography from his last film 8 Million Ways to Die (1986). As a result, Ashby became largely unemployable as a film director.

Diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, Hal Ashby died on December 27, 1988 at the age of 59.

His influence on the films of the 1970s remains strong even today with his films Harold and Maude and Being There both being selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.”

~Terry Gale

Academy Award Predictions 2014


Here are my annual Oscar predictions for this year’s Academy Awards in the top categories, featuring the movie nominations from 2013. The winners of the 86th Academy Awards will be announced on March 2nd, 2014. “And the Oscar Goes To …”12 Years A Slave

Best Motion Picture

  1. 12 Years A Slave
  2. American Hustle
  3. Captain Phillips
  4. Dallas Buyers Club 
  5. Gravity
  6. Her
  7. Nebraska
  8. Philomena
  9. The Wolf of Wall Street
  • My Prediction: 12 Years a Slave
  • Strong Second Choice: Gravity
  • Surprise Omission: Inside Llewyn Davis

Best Achievement In Directinggravity-alfonso-cuaron-george-clooney-set-image

  1. Alfonso Cuarón, Gravity
  2. Steve McQueen, 12 Years A Slave
  3. Alexander Payne, Nebraska
  4. David O. Russell, American Hustle
  5. Martin Scorsese, The Wolf of Wall Street
  • My Prediction: Alfonso Cuarón, Gravity
  • Strong Second Choice: Steve McQueen, 12 Years a Slave
  • Surprise Omission: Paul Greengrass, Captain Phillips

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Rolers_1024x759-130828140235-1024.dallas-buyers-club-mcconaughey.ls.82813_copy

  1. Christian Bale, American Hustle
  2. Bruce Dern, Nebraska
  3. Chiwetel Ejiofor, 12 Years a Slave
  4. Matthew McConaughey, Dallas Buyers Club
  5. Leonardo DiCaprio, The Wolf of Wall Street
  • My Prediction: Matthew McConaughey, Dallas Buyers Club
  • Strong Second Choice: Bruce Dern, Nebraska
  • Surprise Omissions: Tom Hanks, Captain Phillips / Robert Redford, All Is Lost

Lead Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading RoleBlue-Jasmine

  1. Amy Adams, American Hustle
  2. Cate Blanchett, Blue Jasmine
  3. Judi Dench, Philomena
  4. Meryl Streep, August: Osage County
  5. Sandra Bullock, Gravity
  • My Prediction: Cate Blanchett, Blue Jasmine
  • Strong Second Choice: Cate Blanchett, Blue Jasmine
  • Surprise Omission: Emma Thompson, Saving Mr. Banks

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting RoleDALLAS-BUYERS-CLUB

  1. Barkhad Abdi, Captain Phillips
  2. Bradley Cooper, American Hustle
  3. Michael Fassbender, 12 Years a Slave
  4. Jonah Hill, The Wolf of Wall Street
  5. Jared Leto, Dallas Buyers Club
  • My Prediction: Jared Leto, Dallas Buyers Club
  • Strong Second Choice: Michael Fassbender, 12 Years a Slave
  • Surprise Omission: Daniel Brühl for Rush

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role12_Years_a_Slave_Lupita_Nyong_o

  1. Sally Hawkins, Blue Jasmine
  2. Jennifer Lawrence, American Hustle
  3. Lupita Nyong’o, 12 Years a Slave
  4. Julia Roberts, August: Osage County
  5. June Squibb, Nebraska
  • My Prediction: Lupita Nyong’o, 12 Years a Slave
  • Strong Second Choice: Jennifer Lawrence, American Hustle
  • Surprise Omission: Oprah Winfrey, The Butler

Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Publishedbanner-12-years-a-slave

  1. Before Midnight, written by Richard Linklater, Julie Delpy, Ethan Hawke
  2. Captain Phillips, screenplay by Billy Ray
  3. Philomena, screenplay by Steve Coogan and Jeff Pope
  4. 12 Years a Slave, screenplay by John Ridley
  5. The Wolf of Wall Street, screenplay by Terence Winter
  • My Prediction: 12 Years a Slave, screenplay by John Ridley
  • Strong Second Choice: Philomena, screenplay by Steve Coogan and Jeff Pope
  • Surprise Omission: The Spectacular Now, screenplay by Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber

Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the ScreenAmerican-Hustle-movie-poster-review

  1. American Hustle, written by Eric Warren Singer and David O. Russell
  2. Blue Jasmine, written by Woody Allen
  3. Dallas Buyers Club, written by Craig Borten and Melisa Wallack
  4. Her, written by Spike Jonze
  5. Nebraska, written by Bob Nelson
  • My Prediction: American Hustle, written by Eric Warren Singer and David O. Russell
  • Strong Second Choice: Her, written by Spike Jonze
  • Surprise Omission: Inside Llewyn Davis, written by Joel Coen and Ethan Coen

Best Animated Feature Filmfrozen1

  1. The Croods
  2. Despicable Me 2
  3. Ernest & Celestine
  4. Frozen
  5. The Wind Rises
  • My Prediction: Frozen
  • Strong Second Choice: Frozen
  • Surprise Omission: Monsters University

Best Foreign Language Film4j18i9pe0ajf38o756fn1otz25_2

  1. The Broken Circle Breakdown (Belgium)
  2. The Great Beauty (Italy)
  3. The Hunt (Denmark)
  4. The Missing Picture (Cambodia)
  5. Omar (Palestine)
  • My Prediction: The Great Beauty (Italy)
  • Strong Second Choice: The Hunt (Denmark)
  • Surprise Omission: Many great foreign films were not eligible. Each country is only allowed one submission for consideration.

Best Documentary, Feature17711-series-header

  1. The Act of Killing
  2. Cutie and the Boxer
  3. Dirty Wars
  4. The Square
  5. 20 Feet from Stardom
  • My Prediction: The Act of Killing
  • Strong Second Choice: 20 Feet from Stardom
  • Surprise Omission: Stories We Tell

 Best Achievement in Music Written for Motion Pictures, Original Song0b7465a53ac03fa378ade313728546be

  1. Happy from Despicable Me 2
  2. Let It Go from Frozen
  3. The Moon Song from Her
  4. Ordinary Love from Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom
  • My Prediction: Let It Go
  • Strong Second Choice: The Moon Song
  • Surprise Omission: Young and Beautiful from The Great Gatsby

 

 

 

The Best Reviewed Films of 2013


  The Best Reviewed Wide Releases of 2013

1

12 Years a Slave Drama

2

Gravity Sci-Fi

3

Before Midnight Drama

4

Her Drama, Comedy, Sci-Fi

5

American Hustle Comedy, Drama

6

Fruitvale Station Drama

7

Dallas Buyers Club Drama

8

Captain Phillips Drama, Thriller

9

The Spectacular Now Drama

10

The World’s End Comedy, Action

11

Enough Said Comedy, Drama

12

Blue Jasmine Comedy, Drama

13

Philomena Drama

14

Mud Drama

15

Rush Drama, Sports

16

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire Sci-Fi, Action-Adventure

17

The Wolf of Wall Street Drama

18

Side Effects Thriller

19

Frozen Animation, Family

20

Prisoners Thriller

21

The Grandmaster Foreign, Action

22

Star Trek Into Darkness Sci-Fi, Action

23

The Conjuring Horror

24

The Way, Way Back Comedy, Drama

25

The Place Beyond the Pines Drama
       

 

 

The Best Reviewed Limited Releases of 2013

1

Inside Llewyn Davis Drama, Comedy

2

Stories We Tell Documentary

3

The Act of Killing Foreign, Documentary

4

Blue Is the Warmest Color Foreign, Drama

5

All Is Lost Drama

6

Nebraska Drama, Comedy

7

Drug War Foreign, Thriller

8

The Great Beauty Foreign, Drama

9

Let the Fire Burn Documentary

10

The Wind Rises Foreign, Animation

11

War Witch Foreign, Drama

12

Museum Hours Foreign, Drama

13

Blackfish Documentary

14

20 Feet from Stardom Documentary

15

The Selfish Giant Drama

16

La Camioneta: The Journey of
One American School Bus
Foreign, Documentary

17

The Past Foreign, Drama

18

56 Up Documentary

19

The Square Foreign, Documentary

20

Cutie and the Boxer Foreign, Documentary

21

These Birds Walk Foreign, Documentary

22

Viola Foreign, Drama

23

Short Term 12 Drama

24

Frances Ha Comedy, Drama

25

A Hijacking Foreign, Thriller

 Source: Metacritic

Academy Award Nominations 2014


Best Motion Pictureamerican_hustle_ver6_xlrg

  1. American Hustle
  2. Captain Phillips
  3. Dallas Buyers Club
  4. Gravity
  5. Her
  6. Nebraska
  7. Philomena
  8. 12 Years a Slave
  9. The Wolf of Wall Street

Missing:

  1. Inside Llewyn Davis
  2. Saving Mr. Banks
  3. Fruitvale Station
  4. Blue JasmineCaptain Phillips
  5. Rush
  6. Before Midnight
  7. August: Osage County
  8. The Butler

Best Achievement In Directing

  1. Alfonso Cuarón for Gravity
  2. Steve McQueen for 12 Years a Slave
  3. David O. Russell for American Hustle
  4. Martin Scorsese for The Wolf of Wall Street
  5. Alexander Payne for Nebraska

Missing:

  1. Paul Greengrass for Captain Phillips
  2. Spike Jonze for Her
  3. Jean-Marc Vallée for Dallas Buyers ClubDallas-Buyers-Club-2013-Movie-Poster
  4. Stephen Frears for Philomena
  5. Ethan Coen and Joel Coen for Inside Llewyn Davis
  6. Woody Allen for Blue Jasmine
  7. John Lee Hancock for Saving Mr. Banks
  8. Lee Daniels for The Butler

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role

  1. Christian Bale for American Hustle
  2. Bruce Dern for Nebraska
  3. Leonardo DiCaprio for The Wolf of Wall Street
  4. Chiwetel Ejiofor for 12 Years a Slave
  5. Matthew McConaughey for Dallas Buyers Club

Missing:

  1. Tom Hanks for Captain PhillipsGravity
  2. Robert Redford for All Is Lost
  3. Oscar Isaac for Inside Llewyn Davis
  4. Joaquin Phoenix for Her
  5. Idris Elba for Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom
  6. Forest Whitaker for The Butler

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role

  1. Amy Adams for American Hustle
  2. Cate Blanchett for Blue Jasmine
  3. Sandra Bullock for Gravity
  4. Judi Dench for Philomena
  5. Meryl Streep for August: Osage County

Missing:

  1. Emma Thompson for Saving Mr. Banks
  2. Brie Larson for Short Term 12her_xlg
  3. Kate Winslet for Labor Day
  4. Julie Delpy for Before Midnight
  5. Greta Gerwig for Frances Ha
  6. Berenice Bejo for The Past
  7. Julia Louis-Dreyfus for Enough Said

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role

  1. Barkhad Abdi for Captain Phillips
  2. Bradley Cooper for American Hustle
  3. Jonah Hill for The Wolf of Wall Street
  4. Michael Fassbender for 12 Years a Slave
  5. Jared Leto for Dallas Buyers Club (2013)

Missing:

  1. Daniel Brühl for Rush
  2. James Gandolfini for Enough Saidnebraska_xlg
  3. Tom Hanks for Saving Mr. Banks
  4. James Franco for Spring Breakers
  5. Will Forte for Nebraska

Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role

  1. Sally Hawkins for Blue Jasmine
  2. Julia Roberts for August: Osage County
  3. Lupita Nyong’o for 12 Years a Slave
  4. Jennifer Lawrence for American Hustle
  5. June Squibb for Nebraska

Missing:

  1. Oprah Winfrey for The Butler
  2. Scarlett Johansson for Her
  3. Octavia Spencer for Fruitvale Station
  4. Margot Robbie for The Wolf of Wall Streetphilomena_xlrg
  5. Sarah Paulson for 12 Years a Slave

Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Published

  1. Before Midnight: Richard Linklater, Julie Delpy, Ethan Hawke
  2. Captain Phillips: Billy Ray
  3. 12 Years a Slave: John Ridley
  4. The Wolf of Wall Street: Terence Winter
  5. Philomena: Steve Coogan, Jeff Pope

Missing:

  1. August: Osage County: Tracy Letts
  2. Blue Is The Warmest Color: Ghalia Lacroix and Abdellatif Kechiche
  3. Short Term 12: Daniel Cretton
  4. The Spectacular Now: Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber12 Years A Slave
  5. Lone Survivor: Peter Berg

Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen

  1. American Hustle: Eric Singer, David O. Russell
  2. Blue Jasmine: Woody Allen
  3. Her: Spike Jonze
  4. Nebraska: Bob Nelson
  5. Dallas Buyers Club: Craig Borten, Melisa Wallack

Missing:

  1. Inside Llewyn Davis: Joel Coen and Ethan Coen
  2. Enough Said: Nicole Holofcener,
  3. Gravity: Alfonso Cuaron and Jonas Cuaron,
  4. Saving Mr. Banks: Kelly Marcel and Sue Smith
  5. Fruitvale Station: Ryan Coogler
  6. Mud: Jeff Nichols
  7. Prisoners: Aaron GuzikowskiThe Wolf of Wall Street

Best Animated Feature Film

  1. The Croods
  2. Despicable Me 2
  3. Ernest & Celestine
  4. Frozen
  5. The Wind Rises

Missing:

  1. Monsters University
  2. Epic
  3. A Letter To Momo

Foreign Language Film

  1. The Broken Circle Breakdown (Belgium)FROZN_014M_G_ENG-GB_70x100.indd
  2. The Missing Picture (Cambodia)
  3. The Hunt (Denmark)
  4. The Great Beauty (Italy)
  5. Omar (Palestine)

Missing:

  1. The Notebook (Hungary)
  2. The Grandmaster (Hong Kong)
  3. An Episode in the Life of an Iron Picker (Bosnia and Herzegovina)
  4. Two Lives (Germany)

Not Eligible:

  1. Afternoon Delight (Phillippines)
  2. Blue is the Warmest Color (France)croods_ver8
  3. Child’s Pose (Romania)
  4. Computer Chess (Germany)
  5. Concussion (Germany)
  6. Gabrielle (Canada)
  7. Gloria (Chile)
  8. Hijacking, A (Denmark)
  9. Ilo Ilo (Singapore)
  10. Past, The (Iran)
  11. Rocket, The (Australia)
  12. Touch of Sin, A (Italy)
  13. Una Noche (Taiwan)
  14. Wadjda (Saudi Arabia)

Best Documentary Feature

  1. The Act of Killing
  2. Cutie and the Boxer
  3. Dirty WarsDespicable-Me-2-poster
  4. The Square
  5. 20 Feet from Stardom

Missing:

  1. Stories We Tell
  2. The Crash Reel
  3. Blackfish
  4. Tim’s Vermeer
  5. God Loves Uganda

Notable Movies of 2013


Here are the notable movies of 2013:12 Years A Slave

  1. 12 Years a Slave
  2. 42
  3. All is Lost
  4. American Hustle
  5. August: Osage County
  6. Before Midnight
  7. Bling Ring, The
  8. Blue Caprice
  9. Blue Jasmine
  10. Book Thief, The
  11. Butler, The
  12. Captain Phillips
  13. Crystal Fairy & the Magical Cactus
  14. Dallas Buyers Club
  15. Don Jon
  16. Enough Saidamerican-hustle-movie-poster
  17. Foxy Merkins, The
  18. Frances Ha
  19. Fuitvale Station
  20. Go For Sisters
  21. Gravity
  22. Her
  23. In a World
  24. Inevitable Defeat of Mister & Pete, The
  25. Inside Llewyn Davis
  26. Invisible Woman, The
  27. Kill Your Darlings
  28. Labor Day
  29. Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom
  30. Mud
  31. Museum Hours
  32. My Sister’s Quinceanera
  33. NebraskaGravity
  34. Newlyweeds
  35. One Chance
  36. Out of the Furnace
  37. Philomena
  38. Pit Stop
  39. Place Beyond The Pines, The
  40. Prisoners
  41. Rush
  42. Saving Mr. Banks
  43. Short Term 12
  44. Spectacular Now, The
  45. Spring Breakers
  46. This Is Martin Bonner
  47. Upstream Color
  48. Way, Way Back, The
  49. Wolf of Wall Street, The
  50. World’s End, Thenebraska_xlg

Foreign Language Films

  1. Afternoon Delight (Phillippines)
  2. Blue is the Warmest Color (France)
  3. Broken Circle Breakdown, The (Belgium)
  4. Child’s Pose (Romania)
  5. Computer Chess (Germany)
  6. Concussion (Germany)
  7. Episode in the Life of an Iron Picker, An (Bosnia and Herzegovina)
  8. Gabrielle (Canada)
  9. Gloria (Chile)
  10. Grandmaster, The (Hong Kong)
  11. Great Beauty, The (Italy)
  12. Hunt, The (Denmark)
  13. Hijacking, A (Denmark)Captain Phillips
  14. Ilo Ilo (Singapore)
  15. Missing Picture, The (Cambodia)
  16. Notebook, The (Hungary)
  17. Omar (Palestine)
  18. Past, The (Iran)
  19. Rocket, The (Australia)
  20. Touch of Sin, A (Italy)
  21. Two Lives (Germany)
  22. Una Noche (Taiwan)
  23. Wadjda (Saudi Arabia)

Documentaries

  1. 20 Feet from Stardom
  2. Act of Killing, The
  3. After Tiller
  4. Armstrong Lie, TheInside Llewyn Davis
  5. At Berkeley
  6. Blackfish
  7. Crash Reel, The
  8. Cutie and the Boxer
  9. Dirty Wars
  10. First Cousin Once Removed
  11. Gideon’s Army
  12. God Loves Uganda
  13. Let The Fire Burn
  14. Leviathan
  15. Life According to Sam
  16. Manakamana
  17. Pussy Riot: A Punk Prayer
  18. River Changes Course, A
  19. Square, The
  20. Stories We Tell
  21. Tim’s VermeerThe Wolf of Wall Street
  22. Which Way Is the Front Line from Here? The Life and Time of Tim Hetherington

Animated Films

  1. Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2
  2. Croods, The
  3. Despicable Me 2
  4. Epic
  5. Ernest & Celestine
  6. Frozen
  7. Letter to Momo, A
  8. Monsters University
  9. Turbo
  10. Walking with Dinosaurs
  11. Wind Rises, The

Blockbustersher_xlg

  1. Conjuring, The
  2. Ender’s Game
  3. Fast and Furious 6
  4. G.I. Joe: Retaliation
  5. Great Gatsby, The
  6. Grown Ups 2
  7. Hangover Part III, The
  8. Heat, The
  9. Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug, The
  10. Hunger Games: Catching Fire, The
  11. Identity Thief
  12. Iron Man 3
  13. Insidious Chapter 2
  14. Lone Survivor
  15. Mama
  16. Man of SteelSaving Mr. Banks
  17. Now You See Me
  18. Oz: The Great and Powerful
  19. Pacific Rim
  20. Star Trek: Into Darkness
  21. This Is the End
  22. Thor: The Dark World
  23. We’re The Millers
  24. Wolverine. The
  25. World War Z
  26. You’re Next

 

The 2013 Academy Award Winners


The Oscar 2013 Winners:

Here is the complete list of 2013 Academy Award winners:argo01
Best Director:
Best Actor:
Best Actress:
Best Supporting Actor:
Best Supporting Actress:
Best Original Screenplay:
Best Adapted Screenplay:
Best Animated Feature:

Best Foreign Language FIlm:

Best Documentary Feature:

Best Cinematography:

Best Film Editing:

Best Production Design:

Best Costume Design:

Best Original Score:

Best Original Song:

Best Sound Editing (tie):

Best Sound Mixing:

Best Visual Effects:

Best Makeup and Hairstyling:

Best Animated Short:

Best Live Action Short:

Best Documentary Short:

My Predicitons for the 2013 Academy Awards


The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will hand out the Academy Awards on Sunday, February 24, 2013.argo-affleck-852-04022909

Here are my predictions:

Best Motion Picture Predicted Winner:

  • Argo – This inspirational, true-life take on an incredible tale of courage and perseverance seems to have the most positive buzz among the press. It has also dominated the major categories at the Golden Globes, SAGs, DGAs, PGAs and BAFTA Awards.  The snub for Ben Affleck in the Best Director category has seemed to help propel this film forward.

Best Motion Picture Possible Upset:

  • Lincoln – This epic tale also has a small chance to take the top prize, as it made a strong showing with the number of Academy Award nominations. This upset is very slim though, as Argo is the lincoln-daniel-day-lewismore likely winner.

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role Predicted Winner:

  • Daniel Day-Lewis for LincolnA two-time Academy Award winner in this category, Day-Lewis has the most critical momentum and the most number of other honours for this role for him to take the top honor in this category.

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role Possible Upset:

  • Hugh Jackman for Les Misérables – Jackman is a very charismatic presence in Hollywood and has generated a lot of positive buzz around a heartfelt performance that shows off his skills as an actor and singer. Jackman though is not very likely to win over Day-Lewis.

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role Predicted Winner:

  • Emmanuelle Riva for Amour  – As  the oldest person ever to be nominated in this category, Riva has garnered a considerable amount of praise for her sensitive portrayal of a women amour-riva_2448292bin her declining years including the BAFTA award for Best Actress.

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role Possible Upset:

  • Jennifer Lawrence for Silver Linings Playbook – Lawrence is a huge rising star in Hollywood and has generated lots of positive buzz for her performance. She is definitely the “It” girl in Hollywood and has a very strong chance of taking home this award.

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role Predicted Winner:

  • Christoph Waltz for Django Unchained – This category is going to very close to predict with all the nominees being previous Oscar winners. Though most film critics are going with Robert De Niro, I will still have to go with Waltz for his portrayal of a menacing bounty hunter. He also has already picked up the Golden Globe and the BAFTA in this category and is well-respected in Hollywood.

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role Possible Upset:christopher-waltz-jamie-foxx-django-unchained

  • Tommy Lee Jones for Lincoln – Lee Jones is also very well liked and respected as an actor. His performance also has generated a lot of acclaim including a SAG award in this same category.

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role Predicted Winner:

  • Anne Hathaway for Les Misérables – Hathaway has generated the most positive buzz and acclaim for a performance where she shows off her talents as an actress and singer. She is also very well liked in Hollywood and is by far the favorite to win in this category.

 Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role  Possible Upset:

  • Sally Field for Lincoln – Field has also received a lot of positive attention for her performance and is very well liked and respected in Hollywood. She has already won two Oscars and people like a comeback story. It is though very unlikely that she will win over Hathaway in this category.

Best Achievement in Directing Predicted Winner:1500_les_miserables_anne_hathaway

  • Michael Haneke for Amour – With Affleck and Bigelow out of the picture, the winner is likely going to be Haneke for directing for what many consider to be the best picture of the last year even though it is a foreign language film.

Best Achievement in Directing Possible Upset:

  • Steven Spielberg for Lincoln – The veteran filmmaker is one of the most successful and accomplished directors of all-time and has the name clout with voters. He is also a two-time winner in this category.  As Affleck has taken home most of the other major prizes in this category, this one is harder to predict with even Ang Lee having a shot for Life of Pi, as Lee is also a previous winner in this category.

Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen Predicted Winner:

  • Amour: Michael Haneke – This is really a close call; I will have to give a slight lead to Haneke for his screenplay for Amour,  considered to be one of the best films of last year.Michael-Haneke--Amour

Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen Possible Upset:

  • Django Unchained: Quentin Tarantino – A previous winner in this category, Tarantino also has a really good shot at winning, having already won the BAFTA and Golden Globe for this screenplay. Tarantino also has the name recognition factor.

Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Published Predicted Winner:

  • Argo: Chris Terrio  – This category is also going to be really close. Though, I will have to go with the screenplay for Argo, which has already won a Writers Guild Award. Argo is very popular amongst award voters and has garnered more buzz due to Affleck’s snub in the Best Director category.

Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Published Nominees:

  • Silver Linings Playbook: David O. Russell – Russell also has a really strong chance of winning in this category, having already won the BAFTA and Independent Spirit Award. The filmSILVER-LININGS-PLAYBOOK-DIR-David-O-Russell-with-Bradley-Cooper-and-Jennifer-Lawrence also has a lot of positive buzz.

Best Animated Feature Film of the Year Predicted Winner:

  • Brave – Out of all the animated films this past year, this film has generated the most acclaim and accolades, including the Golden Globe and the BAFTA in this category. Brave was also the highest grossing animated film at the box office this past year.

Best Animated Feature Film of the Year Possible Upset:

  • Wreck-It Ralph – This film also has a shot in this category, as it also has had a lot of positive press and was a big draw at the box office this past year. 

Best Foreign Language Film of the Year Predicted Winner:

  • Amour (Austria) – This film is almost a sure bet in this category. Out of all the foreign language films this year, this one has garnered the most awards, including the Golden Globe Braveand the BAFTA, acclaim and positive press.

Best Foreign Language Film of the Year Possible Upset:

  • A Royal Affair (Denmark) – Though all the nominations were strong candidates, I will have to go with this costume period drama for a distant second place. Note: None of the films, including this one, really stand a chance against Amour in this category.

Best Documentary, Feature Predicted Winner:

  • Searching for Sugar Man – Out of all the Documentary Features, this film is the most crowd pleasing and has the most positive buzz, It has already won the BAFTA in this category, as well as Producers and Writers Guild awards.

Best Documentary, Feature Possible Upset:

  • The Invisible War – All the other contenders in this category deal with more somber subject matters and are all excellent films in their one right, making this category hard to call. I will have to go with this feature as a possible upset, as the film deals with the disturbing subject of sexual assaults of female personnel in the military. Though 5 Broken Cameras, The Gatekeepers, and How to Survive a Plague all also stand a chance of winning.daniel-craig-judi-dench-skyfall

Best Achievement in Music Written for Motion Pictures, Original Song Predicted Winner:

  • “Skyfall” from Skyfall: Adele, Paul Epworth – This was a huge film this year and the song was one of the many highlights. The song has already won a number of major awards and is also co-written and sung by Adele, who is extremely popular.

Best Achievement in Music Written for Motion Pictures, Original Song Possible Upset:

Best and Worst Reviewed Movies of 2012


According to Metacritic, here are the best and worst movies of 2012 based on the site’s metascores.

The Best Wide Releases of 2012:zero_dark_thirty_ver2

   Movie  Genre

1

Zero Dark Thirty  Action, Drama, Thriller

2

Lincoln Drama

3

Argo Drama

4

The Master Drama

5

Moonrise Kingdom Drama, Comedy

6

Looper Sci-Fi, Action

7

Skyfall Action

8

Silver Linings Playbook Drama, Comedy

9

Django Unchained Action, Drama, Western

10

The Secret World of Arrietty Animation, Family

11

Life of Pi Drama, Adventure

12

The Dark Knight Rises Action

13

Flight Drama

14

Frankenweenie Animation, Family

15

The Raid: Redemption Action

16

The Pirates! Band of Misfits Animation, Family

17

Wreck-It Ralph Animation, Family

18

Magic Mike Drama, Comedy

19

The Cabin in the Woods Horror

20

ParaNorman Animation, Family

21

Brave Animation, Family

22

The Avengers Action

23

Chronicle Action

24

21 Jump Street Action, Comedy

25

End of Watch Drama, Thriller

The Worst Wide Releases of 2012:

   Movie Genre

1

Silent Hill: Revelation 3D Horror

2

The Apparition Horror

3

The Devil Inside Horror

4

One for the Money Action, Comedy

5

The Cold Light of Day Action, Thriller

6

Atlas Shrugged: Part 2 Drama

7

A Thousand Words Comedy

8

Playing for Keeps Rom-com

9

Alex Cross Thriller

10

House at the End of the Street Horror

The Best Limited Releases of 2012:

   Movie Genre

1

Amour Foreign, Drama

2

This Is Not a Film Foreign, Documentary

3

The Gatekeepers Foreign, Documentary

4

How to Survive a Plague Documentary

5

Barbara Foreign, Drama

6

Elena Foreign, Drama

7

The Kid with a Bike Foreign, Drama

8

Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters Documentary

9

Beasts of the Southern Wild Drama, Fantasy

10

The Waiting Room Documentary

11

Holy Motors Foreign, Drama

12

Oslo, August 31st Foreign, Drama

13

Monsieur Lazhar Foreign, Drama

14

The Day He Arrives Foreign, Drama

15

The Flat Foreign, Documentary

16

Side by Side Documentary

17

The Deep Blue Sea Drama

18

In the Family Drama

19

Tabu Foreign, Drama

20

Footnote Foreign, Drama

21

Marley Music, Documentary

22

Under African Skies Music, Documentary

23

Once Upon a Time in Anatolia Foreign, Drama

24

Sister Foreign, Drama

25

Tchoupitoulas Documentary

The Worst Limited Releases of 2012:

   Movie Genre

1

The Tortured Horror, Thriller

2

A Little Bit of Heaven Rom-com

3

Excuse Me for Living Comedy

4

After Fall, Winter Drama

5

Assassin’s Bullet Action, Thriller

6

Smiley Horror

7

30 Beats Rom-com

8

Supercapitalist Thriller

9

That’s What She Said Comedy

10

Beneath the Darkness Horror, Thriller